Might it be useful to change the All Full System Scan to cover the range of 76,000 - 300,000hz or to create a second scan to cover 152,000-300,000hz? Is there any harm in running biofeedback frequencies between 152,000 to 300,000hz?

1. A simple search for TED shows that this has been discussed at least 4 times in the past: https://www.facebook.com/groups/spooky2/search/?query=TED&hc_location=ufi

2. A lot to cover to really answer your question well, but here's a bit of info to get you started as this is not a simple answer. 1) Might it be useful to change the All Full System Scan to cover the range of 76,000 - 300,000hz or to create a second scan to cover 152,000-300,000hz? 2) Is there any harm in running biofeedback frequencies between 152,000 to 300,000hz? The 76,000 Hz to 152,000 Hz covers an octal range. 152 is double that of 76. A good analogy is that when you play a piano, you are scanning from from middle C to high C. Once you hit the high D note, it has properties that are common with middle D. When you double the frequency of middle C or middle D, you get the next C and D one octave higher. This is just a fundamental property of sound. Using MOR % tolerance, each frequency in this range has a minimum of a +- 19 Hz overlap or resonance. So we use a step size of 20 Hz to cover all frequencies in this range. Using this, we have 3800 frequencies to scan. A hit for 153,200 which is not covered directly in the scan will be accounted for by a hit on 76,600 Hz due to resonance. There is no real advantage to scan 152 - 300 kHz at the same time, and if we did wish to cover this range, it would be better to use 152 - 304 kHz with a step size of 40. The more you try to scan, the longer it takes. You could define your scan if you feel it advantageous, from 76000 - 304000 Hz, step size 20 (have to go with the smallest step size which is governed by 76000) but then you will have 7600 frequencies to scan, which will take 2 - 4 hours to perform. Additionally, there is no guarantee that the results you got back will target anything to do with cancer. The body will prioritize what it returns, with no preference to our personal desires on what we wish to retrieve.

3. To further elaborate on the goals of those 3 presets. 1. High frequency is looking to try and obtain hits for BX in the 12 MHz range which is a resonant range of BX 4 octaves higher than what was originally used. This is based off the British Rife's ideas on harmonics shared between two different machines Rife used in the past. 2. BX has a known frequency of 1604000, and thus the second scan is looking to try and obtain hits for BX in this range +- 1 MHz. 3. The regular defined biofeedback scan is looking to address what the body reports as important. 76 - 152 kHz covers one octave as explained above, and we started with 76 kHz as Dr. Hulda Clark found most pathogens live between 76 kHz and 880 kHz. To scan the entire range would be an ordeal, so we isolated it to one octave and rely on resonance to pull out hits for the other frequencies.

For more information please check this link:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/spooky2/permalink/758272737667965

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